Warning to Visitors

Some of the information below may be out of date as a result of changing timetables and services. Please double check the accuracy of all information before travelling.

The booking forms should be up to date however, so if tickets for a particular service are available, then the service should be operational.

Breclav

Breclav is a Czech town situated on the border with Austria. The town is an important point on the Czech and international rail network. Within the town itself, visitors can find a renaissance castle, as well as a series of chapels and churches worth a visit.

The town is situated at the intersection point of a number of rail routes, with services through Breclav travelling to Brno, Prague, Ostrava, Krakow, Bratislava and Vienna.

How to get to Breclav from
Route 1:

The service between Prague and Budapest is operated by the EuroNight 'Metropol' sleeper train service. Both first and second class sleeping accommodation is available onboard, as well as second class couchettes. A second class seating carriage is also available, although obviously not as comfortable as the other options.

This route is shared between Berlin and Brno with another EuroNight sleeper train service to/from Vienna.

Route 2:

An epic train journey has recently been re-created by Russian Railways in an attempt to link the Russian capital, Moscow, wih the South of France at Nice. The route is designed (perhaps unsurprisingly) for Russians wanting to catch a bit of sun, and hopes to revive some of the glamour of long distance train journeys.

The two day journey doesn't come cheap, with prices starting at over €300, and going as high as €1200. It isn't your average journey however, with comfortable rooms and furnishings. Each compartment has two berths, which can be shared or sole occupancy. Breakfast is included in ticket prices, and is served in the dining car. There are a number of different (tasty) options to choose from.

The rooms, while comfortable, can be a bit on the warm side, and unfortunately the windows don't open, preventing passengers from making the most of air conditioning au naturale! They also lack power sockets, so you will need to bring plenty of old fashioned reading material, or be prepared to make the most of the wide range of views on offer.

Passports and visas are checked at the Poland/Belarus border. At the border, the wheel gauge is changed, but passengers stay onboard for this process. Passengers who aren't Russian will require a transit visa to travel through Belarus. This can be obtained from the Belarussian Embassy. You will be removed from the train if you do not have an appropriate visa.

Want more information? Shaun Walker has written a good in-depth account of his journey on the Nice to Moscow train for the Independent.