Warning to Visitors

Some of the information below may be out of date as a result of changing timetables and services. Please double check the accuracy of all information before travelling.

The booking forms should be up to date however, so if tickets for a particular service are available, then the service should be operational.

Cologne

Cologne (spelt Köln in German), is Germany's fourth largest city, situated on the River Rhein. The city has developed to become one of the country's leading madia and business locations.

The city is well connected by public transport, with trams, trains and buses on offer.

How to get to Cologne from
Route 1:

The City Night Line service between Amsterdam and Copenhagen takes place aboard the Borealis sleeper train. A restaurant car serves passengers between Hamburg and Copenhagen. There are two border crossing points at Emmerich and Flensburg.

Route 2:

There is one direct service per day between Amsterdam and Prague, although there are plenty of indirect services that involve a change at Berlin (although that route is dealt with on a separate page). This service is operated daily by Deutsche Bahn's City Night Line sleeper service, Kopernikus / Phoenix, and calls at Cologne and Berlin en route.

Route 3:

There are a number of services that operate between Amsterdam and Frankfurt. This particular service is the high-speed Inter City Express (ICE), operated by Deutsche Bahn.

Route 4:

The key cities of Amsterdam, Munich and Innsbruck are connected by an overnight City Night Line (CNL) sleeper service known as 'Pollux', that also travels via Cologne, Frankfurt and Stuttgart.

The same journey can be made during the day if so desired, although requires a change of train at Frankfurt.

Route 5:

The Amsterdam to Moscow sleeper train is a EuroNight sleeper service, also calling at stations including Berlin and Cologne. It runs once a day, every day, with a variety of sleeping options, and covering a total distance of 2,757km.

If travelling to/from Scotland or northern England, this route can be quicker than rail-only alternatives, when combined with the Harwich - Hook of Holland (Stena Line) service.

The sleeping car has ten compartments which are configured as either 3-berths, 2-berths or single berths. You can opt to share a multiple berth compartment with a stranger, if you would rather not pay the extra for a single berth. Each compartment doubles up as a sitting room during the day time, with beds that fold down for the evening. Each room has its own basin, and towels and toiletries are provided.

There is a dining car that serves the train between Rzepin and Warsaw, so make sure you bring some extra food and drink with you to last the journey. The carriage attendant is also able to serve tea to passengers en route.

Route 6:

This direct service between Paris, Brussels and Cologne is particularly useful if you are travelling to/from other parts of Europe. Cologne links many European rail destinations, whilst Brussels and Paris have direct links with the United Kingdom via Eurostar.

This journey, made on board a high-speed Thalys service is the most convenient way to travel between the two cities, with regular services throughout the day. There is an alternative InterCity Express service that runs between Brussells and Cologne a few times each day, details of which can be found on its dedicated route page.

Route 7:

When travelling between Vienna (Wien) and Cologne (Koln), you have the choice of either taking the daytime InterCity Express service, or this night time EuroNight sleeper train. Connecting service area available from Cologne to reach Frankfurt and onwards to cities including Amsterdam and Paris.

Onboard this train, a mix of accommodation options are available, including First and Second Class sleeping compartments, as well as Second Class couchettes (4 and 6 berth options).